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Whitesnake - Lovehunter (8/10) - Great Britain - 1979

Genre: Heavy Metal
Label: Geffen
Playing time: 38:57
Band homepage: Whitesnake

Tracklist:

  1. Long Way From Home
  2. We Wish You Well
  3. Walking In The Shadow Of The Blues
  4. Help Me Thro' The Day
  5. Medicine Man
  6. You'n'Me
  7. Mean Business
  8. Love Hunter

  9. Outlaw
  10. Rock'n'Roll Women
Whitesnake - Lovehunter

Recorded back in 1979 “Lovehunter”, the album, was probably the first stepping-stone into making WHITESNAKE a major player in the field of Rock. It didn't break new ground but it gave them a sure footing from which to build their international success. Commercially, this album had its high and lows and starts off with one of the best love songs I think WHITESNAKE has ever penned, “Long Way From Home”, which kicks in, after two short snare beats, with the whole band in unison. This song isn't your regular album starter as it is a song about true love. It was released as a single (in the UK) and bombed brutally with lack of radio play and media support.

 

Followed immediately by “Walking In The Shadow Of The Blues”, which I believe was one of the staple songs that opened the eyes of the world to this mega star studded band. A real stomping blues-based number put together by easily the tightest rhythm section of the time, Neil Murray and Ian Paice. “Medicine Man” is one of those real raunchy rockers. However, “You’n'Me” and “Mean Business” are probably two of the weaker tracks that “Love Hunter” has to offer. Don't get me wrong, neither are horrible songs but they don't kick like the rest of the album. “You’n'Me” sees some fine background Slide Guitar from Micky Moody and Jon Lord slays the keys pretty well during the solo in “Mean Business”, which incidentally is the highest tempo song on this release. “Lovehunter” is another one of those songs that is a staple of their live performances and a smoking classic that is loved by all.

 

“Outlaw” comes as a bit of a surprise simply because Coverdale passes off the lead vocal duty to Bernie Marsden. I have heard that this song, as stated by Coverdale, was not written for his vocals and as I listened to it, I certainly can agree that I could not picture him taking on this steamy classic. “Rock’n’Roll Women” is seen as the last 'real' song on the album. This song reeks of WHITESNAKE and is instantly identifiable. It's Sex, Drugs & Rock‘n'Roll. I said that “Rock’n’Roll Women” is seen as the last true song on the album because the album's finale, “We Wish You Well”, is a very short, simple ballad. WHITESNAKE has boasted some of the most notable musicians in the world since their dynasty began back in the late 60's. Just so you can get the clear picture of what would be considered an all-star band I feel obliged to list some of the players below. Ritchie Blackmore (guitar), Glenn Hughes (bass/vocals), Jon Lord (keyboards), Ian Paice (drums), Tommy Bolin (guitar/vocals), Roger Glover (keyb/bass), Micky Moody (guitar), Bernie Marsden (guitar), Neil Murray (bass), John Sykes (guitar), Cozy Powell (drums), Aynsley Dunbar (drums), Adrian Vandenberg (guitar), Steve Vai (guitar), Rudy Sarzo (bass), Tommy Aldridge (drums), Jimmy Page (guitars), Denny Carmassi (drums), Marco Mendoza (bass).

 

“Lovehunter” would be one of my classic picks of all time to have in any collection as it displays the truest talents of the now grandfathers of rock. I would definitely say that WHITESNAKE are true anthem Rock kings.

Other essential WHITESNAKE albums:

“David Coverdale And Whitesnake” – 1977

”Ready And Willing” – 1978

”Come And Get It” – 1981

”Saints And Sinners” – 1982

”Slide It In” – 1984

”Whitesnake” – 1987

”Slip Of The Tongue” – 1989

”Greatest Hits” – 1994 (Online February 29, 2004)

Greg Manley



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