The Metal Observer - Everything in Metal!

Band-Archives: Metalheads online.  
# | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z By country | By style | By reviewer






Band history still to come.

More Reviews
Current Updates
Print article
Rating explanation



Krohm - A World Through Dead Eyes (8,5/10) - USA - 2004

Genre: Black Metal
Label: Vicious Recordings
Playing time: 53:19
Band homepage: Krohm

Tracklist:

  1. I Suffer The Astral Woe
  2. A Lurking Demon
  3. The Waning
  4. When Morning Never Returned
  5. A World Through Dead Eyes
  6. Silence Turns To Gray
  7. My Hearse
Krohm - A World Through Dead Eyes

I have not given an album a good kicking since joining TMO. I thought this was going to be the first. I was wrong.

 

“A World Through Dead Eyes” required perseverance from me, as I prefer Black Metal of the blasting variety, however a change of heads and an open mind has lead to an appreciation of what KROHM has created here. There are moments of utter brilliance on this album, an album that meanders like a corpse clogged river through fields of despair.

 

Trebly guitars slowly pick tentatively through these songs, akin to a razor blade hovering over an outstretched wrist. Chord-work rarely exceeds a funereal pace and when it does it remains sombre and dirge-like. The only time that any real pace is used is on “My Hearse” and that soon subsides into a ponderous, bleak misery that drags you to its haunting finale.

 

Numinas, being the single entity in KROHM, has afforded himself the purity of emotion to craft these songs of desolation that a group would otherwise sully and so despite the fairly uniform vocalisation the lyrics are tragic and heartfelt. The simple and occasional use of keyboards only serves to emphasise the wretchedness of “A World Through Dead Eyes,” when used, they are a haunting melody quietly flowing through the song structure.

 

The drum work beats out a steady tattoo, a death march in procession with the warm, rounded bass lines. “The Waning” seeps melancholy from every pore, a hymn for the despondent that possesses a stark beauty in its woeful refrain. Having always shunned this form of Black Metal I am really at a loss for any accurate comparison, rest assured though that this is thoroughly depressing music. I initially considered the songs too long but on reflection the track lengths further compound what KROHM seek to portray.

 

If you are of a mind to wallow in despair, with a desire for loneliness and isolation, grab this CD and a player and wander off somewhere dark and secluded. Listen to “A World Through Dead Eyes” and allow yourself to be swallowed by some of the most austere of negative emotions. (Online November, 27 2004)

Niall MacCartney



© 2000-2013 The Metal Observer. All rights reserved. Disclaimer