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9 tablatures for Pain Of Salvation


Pain Of Salvation - Be (8,5/10) - Sweden - 2004

Genre: Progressive Rock
Label: InsideOut
Playing time: 75:59
Band homepage: Pain Of Salvation

Tracklist:

  1. Animae Partus
  2. Deus Nova
  3. Imago
  4. Pluvius Aestivus
  5. Lilium Cruentus
  6. Nauticus
  7. Dea Pecuniae
  8. Vocari Dei
  9. Diffidentia
  10. Nihil Morari
  11. Latericius Valete
  12. Omni
  13. Iter Impius
  14. Martius-Nauticus II
  15. Animae Partus II
Pain Of Salvation - Be

I have to say that I have been waiting for this CD for quite a while now. I am one of those people who can't wait to hear what they put out next because the band is just so creative. When I finally received the CD, I made the mistake of putting this in the car. This album is not as progressive as say “One Hour By The Concrete Lake” or “Entropia”. The elements are there, but you have to really listen for them because they are more spread out and used more sparingly than their past works.

 

That is the one thing that I love about the band. They never make the same album twice and really push the envelope by taking different avenues with each release. This may piss people off, but that is your problem not the bands. This is a thinking man's band. Always have, always will. The disc starts off weird by having pretty much two intros before kicking in the music and lyrics. "Deus Nova" is an instrumental which provides some hints of progressive elements, but they fade away quickly. It's rather slow, but you have to stick with the album. "Imago" is a folk tune that is filled with acoustic guitars, flutes and percussion. It's very atmospheric and calm, but nothing like their previous works.

 

"Pluvius Aestivus" is another instrumental that is all classical piano. It's very colorful and classy. "Lilium Cruentus" finally sees some Prog kicking in, but not much. It's mixed in there with some psychedelic like riffs as well as Nu Metal riffs. Some may frown upon it while others may enjoy it. It depends. Daniel's singing as always is very heart felt and emotional. This man can move mountains and with his intelligent lyrics, the man will get you to think. This time around the story surrounds around questioning faith, man and God. And Daniel doesn't really give you all the answers either. He wants you the listener to dive deeper into the situation. You won't get all the answers just by reading the lyrics. He wants you to read the same books that he has to get a more powerful and intelligent meaning.

 

By the time we hit "Nihil Morari", it's a return to the days of old POS. The riffs strike hard while the drumming is heavy and somewhat technical and the emotional voice can really be heard here. I told you that if you hung in there, there would be a payoff. It's toward the end of the disc where things begin to pick up. "Martius." is a progressive folk song that is well crafted and a pure joy to listen to if you like this brand of music being fused together. This CD will take several listens before you finally get it. I didn't like it at first, but now I know where the band is coming from.

 

Unlike the past where the guys would usually serve you everything right in front of you, this time you have to be patient and at times find it yourself be it musically or lyrically. The band really ventures out on this new CD and if you have stuck with them before, then I strongly suggest that you stay with them now. The journey has just begun. (Online January 18, 2005)

Joe Florez



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