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Napalm Death - Harmony Corruption (9/10) - Great Britain - 1990

Genre: Death Metal
Label: Earache
Playing time: 41:02
Band homepage: Napalm Death

Tracklist:

  1. Vision Conquest
  2. In The Truth Be Known
  3. Inner Incineration
  4. Malicious Intent
  5. Unfit Earth
  6. Circle Of Hypocrisy
  7. The Chains That Bind Us
  8. Mindsnare
  9. Extremity Retained
  10. Suffer The Children
  11. Hiding Behind
Napalm Death - Harmony Corruption

What are we talking about, when we talk about the roots of NAPALM DEATH? We could say we have to go back to “Scum” and its Punk-styled Grindcore, but for the most, the release of their third Full-Length “Harmony Corruption” marks the moment in which a totally different band was born, the same NAPALM DEATH that is still active today.

 

Even if this band is recognized (wrongly although) as the Grind pioneers, only with the first two albums they corroded heads with that genre, while since the arrival of Greenway to the vocals they began to walk straight through the road of Death Metal and the almost totally new formation would finally get stability and got compromise with a particular way of playing that style, without changing the music so much from album to album like they did it before.

 

Musically, “Harmony Corruption” is the best album NAPALM DEATH has done. The whole atmosphere has an incredibly bass tune, mid-tempo but very aggressive and well, with an extraordinary performance of “Barney” Greenway’s corpse-like vocals. On the other hand and just like it had been a characteristic all throughout NAPALM DEATH’s career, the instrumentation Is very simple, underdeveloped and purposely unskilled, with chainsaw riffs and a sound tangled by a truly raw production, but all that apparent confusion and lack of talent is a proper part of the band’s rotten musical concept and if they wanted to corrupt harmony with their third album they surely succeed with honours.

 

Listening to this album could be a difficult experience, specially the first times, as while people who is not adapted to Death Metal could find it extremely dirty and ugly and Deathsters can think it’s too slow and in some way punkish, but I strongly recommend it as it’s a true milestone, a disc that had grew in me with time and is among my most beloved Death Metal jewels… an unleashed discharge of furious, smelly and corrosive art of the harshest kind. Now you decide if give it a try, but if not, please don’t argue then that Death Metal can’t go better than DEICIDE… PLEASE! (Online January 26, 2006)

Daniel Barros



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